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German radios of the 1920s. Crystal sets.

Top: police (Schutzpolizei) with radio, 1923; early listener, 1924

Bottom: Telefunken Telefunkon, 1926; Telefunken Arcolette (galena crystal), 1928

Joseph Roth on the way to Frankfurt, 1920s.

Joseph Roth on the way to Frankfurt, 1920s.

Alexanderplatz, aerial view, 1924.

Alexanderplatz, aerial view, 1924.

the-seed-of-europe:

“Join us. Steel Helmet Youth.” German propaganda poster illustrated by Ludwig Hohlwein, ca. 1920-1923.
“ The Stahlhelm was founded in 1918 by war veteran Franz Seldte, his brothers and some other soldiers from his unit. The association was originally meant as both a mutual aid society for World War I veterans and as a political combat group like many other that sprung up during the 1920s.
     In 1926, it numbered half a million members, by far the largest at the time. Around this time the Stahlhelm entered politics, although unlike similar groups, it didn’t endorse a single party preferring instead to present itself simply as Conservative. It must be said that most of those who became deputies did so as members of the Monarchist Party (DNVP) or Liberal-Nationalist Party (DVP).     As volkish elements entered the Stahlhelm, it continued to slide into a more radical and authoritarian mindset that culminated in the more moderate DVP severing ties with them. The Stahlhelm eventually joined the DNVP/NSDAP coalition that brought Hitler to power.     After 1933, the Stahlhelm was first put under the command of the SA’s leader and in 1935 it was dissolved with its members being absorbed into the Nazi’s Organisation, either in the SA or in the veterans association. Interestingly, the later kept using a steel helmet (though undefaced) as one of its symbols.” (Source.)

the-seed-of-europe:

“Join us. Steel Helmet Youth.” German propaganda poster illustrated by Ludwig Hohlwein, ca. 1920-1923.

 The Stahlhelm was founded in 1918 by war veteran Franz Seldte, his brothers and some other soldiers from his unit. The association was originally meant as both a mutual aid society for World War I veterans and as a political combat group like many other that sprung up during the 1920s.

     In 1926, it numbered half a million members, by far the largest at the time. Around this time the Stahlhelm entered politics, although unlike similar groups, it didn’t endorse a single party preferring instead to present itself simply as Conservative. It must be said that most of those who became deputies did so as members of the Monarchist Party (DNVP) or Liberal-Nationalist Party (DVP).
     As volkish elements entered the Stahlhelm, it continued to slide into a more radical and authoritarian mindset that culminated in the more moderate DVP severing ties with them. The Stahlhelm eventually joined the DNVP/NSDAP coalition that brought Hitler to power.
     After 1933, the Stahlhelm was first put under the command of the SA’s leader and in 1935 it was dissolved with its members being absorbed into the Nazi’s Organisation, either in the SA or in the veterans association. Interestingly, the later kept using a steel helmet (though undefaced) as one of its symbols.” (Source.)

Maps of radio stations, transmitters, and their coverage. From 1924, top; and 1927, bottom.

German radio broadcasting was supervised by the Post Office. A listening fee of 2 Reichsmark per receiver paid most subsidies.

The first radio station in Germany, Berlin Radio Hour (Funk-stunde Berlin) was founded in 1923. It was owned by the Reichs-Rundfunk-Gesellschaft until 1926, when the post office (Reichspost) acquired a majority of its shares.

Marek Weber and his orchestra, “Zigeuner, du hast mein Herz gestohlen,” 1932; singer: Austin Egen.

the-waters-of-lethe:

- Fritz Lang, Destiny (Der Müde Tod)

the-waters-of-lethe:

- Fritz Lang, Destiny (Der Müde Tod)

In 1925 the American Jazz musician Sam Wooding came to Berlin for the first time with his famous Chocolate Kiddies Orchestra. They were the first large, fully black Jazz band to perform in most major European cities and had a lasting success with their “Hot Jazz” style. In Berlin their premiere performance was on May 25, 1925 at the Admirals-Palast. During their tours in 1925 and 1926 the band made recordings with VOX andGrammophon. On their fourth visit in 1930 they performed live at the Berliner Rundfunk radio station in a program entitled “Music from America” offering a wide spectrum of music demonstrating the origins of Black Jazz music.
This and the following image show the band on their third visit to Berlin performing at the Ufa-Palast theater in 1928. Their gig was called “Die schwarze Revue” (the Black Revue) and was part of the Ufa stage show. The stage sets were created by Rudi Feld (1896 - 1994) a German film set designer who was head of the Ufapublicity department as of 1926. (x)

holdthisphoto:

Theater am Schiffbauerdamm, Berlin, 1928

holdthisphoto:

Theater am Schiffbauerdamm, Berlin, 1928

Sam Wooding and his Orchestra were a popular New York Jazz band in the early 1920s. They played at venues such as the The Nest, on the Fox vaudeville circuit and at the Club Alabam. In 1925 Wooding’s band was picked to be the orchestra for a new musical revue called Chocolate Kiddies which was being formed to tour Europe. Chocolate Kiddies was built around the vaudeville team of Rufus and Drayton and featured performances by Wooding’s eleven piece orchestra, thirty chorus girls, dancers and comedians. Edith Wilson and Adeline Hall were vocalists in the show and Tommy Ladnier was the star soloist. Chocolate Kiddies also included music by Duke Ellington and Jo Trent.

(Further photos from here)